A day or so ago I was so inspired by my blossoming number of professional networks, and what I am learning from colleagues spread all over the world, that I drew a picture of what it looked like and posted it on my SLJ Blog.

One of the comments I received referred to my use of Inspiration for the diagram. Why would someone who advances open source or Web-based applications choose to use a commercial app?

Thing is, I started the diagram on a Web-based app, one I knew I could master in an hour or so. But because I was eager to quickly capture what I was brainstorming, I went back to a product on my desktop that I knew very well.

What is interesting here is that before I posted, I felt a wee bit of guilt. When I woke up next morning to discover the critical comment, I initially felt even more guilty.

But wait a minute! Can we not be very excited about the cool Web-based applications that emerge each day and continue to use those commercial applications that have served us so well for so many years?

Must I closet my use of solid commercial software today in the same way I hid my makeup from my most ardent feminist friends in the 70s?

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  1. technotuesday

    Congrats on a well planned and laid out map of your growth in using social networks. I’m pleased to say mine would look VERY similar to yours. Affirmation–just what I needed! And I send this to you to give you affirmation too. We should not throw out the baby with the bathwater. I will always go to my known desktop applications when it is the quickest way to get the job done. I wouldn’t expect students to do anything less. It’s just icing on the cake when we know open source solutions for when we can’t get to our desktop programs we have become accustomed to using. So celebrate that fact and consider the critical comment as merely someone trying to generate thought provoking conversation and nothing more. You are doing a fabulous job in the real world and the blogosphere.

  2. durff

    On the right hand side of the purple lines-the arrows should point to you. The difference between Web1.0 and Web2.0. I don’t care what software you used – immaterial.

  3. Administrator

    Good point, Durff. Probably all the arrows should go both ways, right?

  4. Carolyn Foote

    Joyce,

    I think that we all want to use the tools familiar to us, while adding new ones, and time is sometimes of the essence.

    I think demonstrating the effective use of a visual is the important point here, not what software you used!

    And by the way, I think it’s a great visual display of how things are changing in our profession.

  5. Rob Darrow

    Write on, Joyce! I was excited to discover Bubbl Us – http://bubbl.us/ and was able to adjust it in a word processing program for a recent school related meeting. Please do continue enlightening us with your diagrams and visuals. In many cases, these diagrams and images show things that words can not.

  6. Dee

    Beautiful visual! I think we need to use the tools that work the best for any given situation. I would think all of us would rather use opensource where possible but if we start getting militant about it we scare off the very folks we would like to educate about opensource and free web-based. We go from fun, easy, and cool to being “those computer weirdos”!

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