The October issue of Computer Shopper features a list of of 20 of the best Web 2.0 sites http://computershopper.com/roundups/200610_the_best_web_20_sites_1 compiled by Rick Broida. I can’t wait to try a bunch of them–myself and with students.

Here’s a selection of a few I find most interesting (as described by Rick Broida):

Ta-da List a free Web-hosted service that lets you whip up private or public lists of any kind: chores, favorite movies, business ideas, wines you’ve tried and liked, and so on. And you’ll love the satisfaction that comes from ticking off completed tasks. Ta-da!

Goowy  Goowy (the phonetic of GUI, or graphical user interface) blurs the lines between Web browser and desktop. It provides a Web-based operating environment, reminiscent of Linux, with e-mail, 1GB of file storage, instant messaging, games, contact and calendar management, and “minis”—small applets that provide at-a-glance access to to-do lists, Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds, search engines, and more. True to its name, Goowy wraps all this in an attractive, icon-driven interface. It’s a polished, impressive service, and while we can’t imagine anyone abandoning Windows or the Mac OS for it, it definitely proves the viability of a Web-based operating system.

Gliffy (this one I have played with a bit) This impressive Web-based tool lets you build flowcharts, floor plans, network diagrams, or just about any type of drafting you need. You can add colors, drop shadows, and even gradient fills to your shapes, while collaborating on drawings with other users. 

Shadows
Del.icio.us may have popularized the idea of managing your bookmarks online, but Shadows does it one better. It works on the same basic premise—tag, store, organize, and share your bookmarks—but with a much spiffier interface and more-compelling community features. After registering, you can download the Shadows toolbar for Firefox or Internet Explorer, or just create “bookmarklets” in your browser. You can also import bookmarks, though the service inexplicably makes all these setup tools difficult to find. Once you have everything configured, however, you’ll wonder how you lived without Shadows.